Friday, April 18, 2014

MAHARSHI KARVE - His Life Story

MAHARSHI KARVE
His Life Story in His Own Words

LOOKING BACK By DK KARVE (1936)

The Autobiography of Bharat Ratna Dhondo Keshav Karve

(Book Review by Vikram Waman Karve)

Today 18 April 2014 is the 156th Birth Anniversary of Bharat Ratna Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve (18.04.1858 - 09.11.1962).

I felt that, on this occasion, it would be apt to tell you about his life and work as written by him in his autobiography titled LOOKING BACK published in 1936.

Dear Reader, you must be wondering why I am reviewing an autobiography written in 1936.

Well, sometime back, for six years of my life, I stayed in a magnificent building called Empress Court on 
Maharshi Karve Road at Churchgate in Mumbai.

I share the same surname ( Karve ) as the author.

Also, I happen to be the great grandson of Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve. 

But, beyond that, compared to him I am a nobody – not even a pygmy.
 
Maharshi Karve clearly knew his goal, persisted ceaselessly throughout his life with missionary zeal and transformed the destiny of the Indian Woman.

The first university for women in India, SNDT University, and educational institutions for women under the aegis of the 
Hingne Stree Shiksan Samstha Poona, later renamed Maharshi Karve Stree Shikshan Samstha (MKSSS) Pune, covering the entire spectrum ranging from pre-primary schools to post-graduate, engineering, vocational and professional colleges bear eloquent testimony to his indomitable spirit, untiring perseverance and determined efforts.
 
In his preface, Frederick J Gould, renowned rationalist and lecturer on Ethics, writes that “the narrative is a parable of his career” – a most apt description of the autobiography. The author tells his life-story in a simple straightforward manner, with remarkable candour and humility; resulting in a narrative which is friendly, interesting and readable.
 
Autobiographies are sometimes voluminous tomes, but this a small book, 200 pages, and a very easy comfortable enjoyable read that makes it almost unputdownable.

Dr. Dhondo Keshav Karve writes a crisp, flowing narrative of his life, interspersed with his views and anecdotes, in simple, straightforward style which facilitates the reader to visualize through the author’s eyes the places, period, people and events pertaining to his life and times and the trials and tribulations he faced and struggled to conquer.
 
Dr. Dhondo Keshav Karve was born on 18th of April 1858. In the first few chapters he writes about Murud, his native place in Konkan, Maharashtra, his ancestry and his early life– the description is so vivid that you can clearly “see” through the author’s eye.
 
His struggle to appear in the public service examination (walking 110 miles in torrential rain and difficult terrain to Satara) and his shattering disappointment at not being allowed to appear for the examination (because “he looked too young”) make poignant reading.
 
“Many undreamt of things have happened in my life and given a different turn to my career” he writes, and then goes on to describe his high school and, later, college education at The Wilson College Bombay (Mumbai) narrating various incidents that convinced him of the role of destiny and serendipity in shaping his life and career as a teacher and then Professor of Mathematics.
 
He married at the age of fourteen but began his marital life at the age of twenty! 

This was the custom of those days. 

Let’s read the author’s own words on his domestic life:

 “… I was married at the age of fourteen and my wife was then eight. Her family lived very near to ours and we knew each other very well and had often played together. However after marriage we had to forget our old relation as playmates and to behave as strangers, often looking toward each other but never standing together to exchange words ... We had to communicate with each other through my sister ... My marital life began under the parental roof at Murud when I was twenty …” 

Their domestic bliss was short lived as his wife died after a few years leaving behind a son.

“Thus ended the first part of my domestic life”… he concludes in crisp witty style.
 
An incident highlighting the plight of a widow left an indelible impression on him and germinated in him the idea of widow remarriage.

He married Godubai, who was widowed when she was only eight years old, was a sister of his friend Mr. Joshi, and now twenty three was studying at Pandita Ramabai’s Sharada Sadan as its first widow student.
 
Let’s read in the author’s own words how he asked for her hand in marriage to her father – “I told him…..I had made up my mind to marry a widow. He sat silent for a minute and then hinted that there was no need to go in search of such a bride”.
 
He describes in detail the ostracism he faced from some orthodox quarters and systematically enunciates his life work - his organization of the Widow Marriage Association, Hindu Widows Home, Mahila Vidyalaya, Nishkama Karma Math, and other institutions, culminating in the birth of the first Indian Women’s University (SNDT University).
 
The trials and tribulations he faced in his life-work of emancipation of education of women (widows in particular) and how he overcame them by his persistent steadfast endeavours and indomitable spirit makes illuminating reading and underlines the fact that Dr. DK Karve was no arm-chair social reformer but a person devoted to achieve his dreams on the ground in reality.
 
These chapters form the meat of the book and make compelling reading. 

His dedication and meticulousness is evident in the appendices where he has given date-wise details of his engagements and subscriptions down to the paisa for his educational institutions from various places he visited around the world to propagate their cause.
 
He then describes his world tour, at the ripe age of 71, to meet eminent educationists to propagate the cause of the Women’s University, his later domestic life and ends with a few of his views and ideas for posterity. 

At the end of the book, concluding his autobiography, he writes:

“Here ends the story of my life. I hope this simple story will serve some useful purpose”.
 
Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve wrote this book in 1936. 

He lived on till the 9th of November 1962, achieving so much more on the way, and was conferred the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters ( D.Litt.) by the famous and prestigious Banaras Hindu University (BHU) Varanasi in 1942, followed by University of Poona [Pune] in 1951, SNDT Women’s University in 1955, and the LL.D. by Bombay [Mumbai] University in 1957.
 
Maharshi Dhondo Keshav Karve received the Padma Vibhushan in 1955 and the India’s highest honour the “Bharat Ratna” in 1958, a fitting tribute on his centenary at the glorious age of 100.
 
It is an engrossing and illuminating autobiography, written in simple witty readable storytelling style, and it clearly brings out the mammoth contribution of Maharshi Karve and the trials and tribulations he faced.
 

Epilogue
 
I was born in September 1956, and I have fleeting memories of my great grandfather Maharshi Karve, when I was a small boy, during our visits, till 1962, to Hingne Stree Shikshan Samstha (now called Maharshi Karve Stree Shikshan Samstha).

My mother tells me that I featured in a Films Division Documentary on him during his centenary celebrations in 1958.

Here is a picture of me with my great grandfather Maharshi Karve taken in the year 1958.



Vikram Waman Karve with Maharshi Karve (1958)

It is from some old timers, a few relatives and mainly from books that I learn of his pioneering work in transforming the destiny of the Indian Woman and I thought I should share this.
 
I have written this book review with the hope that some of us, particularly the students and alumni of SNDT University, Cummins College of Engineering for Women, SOFT, Karve Institute of Social Sciences and other educational institutions who owe their very genesis and existence to Maharshi Karve, are motivated to read about his stellar pioneering work and draw inspiration from his autobiography.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this book review. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Humor in Uniform – SHORE BASED MOGUL

HUMOUR IN UNIFORM

(This is an apocryphal story - a spoof – humor in uniform – so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh)

SHORE BASED MOGUL
Hilarious Unforgettable Vignettes of my Glorious Navy Days
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 


SHORE BASED MOGUL

During my long career in the Navy, I have observed that, at any given point of time, there are two types of appointments for individuals in naval uniform:

1. The “man at sea”
2. The “shore based mogul”

In theory, the “shore based mogul” is supposed to support the “man at sea”.

But, in practice, it is exactly the opposite that happens, and the hapless “man at sea” is hounded and dominated by the “shore based mogul”.

Of course, like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, a Naval Officer has to undergo both types of appointments, afloat and ashore, and I have seen many a powerful “shore based mogul” reduced to a powerless “man at sea” when he went for his sea appointment, and vice versa.

The exceptions are some lucky individuals who never have to go to sea, like officers in “landlubber branches” and lady naval officers, who always remain powerful “shore based moguls”.

After slogging at sea, and a few “powerless” appointments ashore, one fine day, I suddenly realized that I had become a “shore based mogul” when I was transferred to the mighty naval dockyard on the eastern seaboard.

Actually, my department was a “post office”.

Ships raised various defects which they wanted us to repair, and, like a post office does, we stamped the forms.

Our “stamp” indicated how the job was to be done.

Now, let me tell you how my “post office” ran.

There were many sundry officers and staff in the department doing all sorts of work, but essentially, the whole show was run by two senior foremen – experienced veterans who had spent more than 30 years slogging in various departments of the dockyard.

One was a “good cop” and the other was a “bad cop”.

If I wanted a job to be done, I would send it to the “good cop” who would stamp the request accordingly.

If I did not want a job to be done, I would send the request to the “bad cop” who had some interesting stamps in his drawer.

He would then use his ingenuity.

Let me give you a few examples (illustrative examples, purely apocryphal):

He could stamp “SS” – which meant that “Ship’s Staff” is to do the job.

Quite a “Catch 22” case – if ship’s staff could do the job then why would they project it to the Dockyard in the first place.

(Of course, I am sure “insiders” know the answer to that one)

Or he could stamp “SSRR” – “ship’s staff remove and refit” – this was like a “carry in” repair where the ship’s sailors would remove the item, land it in the dockyard, collect it after repairs, and refit the item back into the ship.

This was okay for smaller items, which we had agreed to do and were handled by the “good cop”.

But when “bad cop” used the “SSRR” stamp with a wicked smile on his face, he did so for such items which it was impossible for the ship’s sailors to remove from the ship.

We once had a furious Engineer Officer who had been asked to remove his main engine and land it in the dockyard – “SSRR” the “bad cop” had stamped on the request.

“Bad Cop” had many such interesting stamps, but the trump card in bad cop’s repertoire was the stamp “QA”

“QA” meant “Quote Authority” and it threw the ship’s staff into a tizzy.

No one knew who or what this “authority” was.

If a confused officer landed up asking as to who was the “authority” to be “quoted”, our “bad cop” would say matter-of-factly: “How do I know? If I knew I wouldn’t ask you.”

This system was running fine.

I have learnt one thing – if a system is running fine, don’t tamper with it – so I let the system run, and everyone in the department was happy.

One evening I unexpectedly met an old shipmate in the swimming pool.

We had served together on a ship around 12 years ago when I was doing my first sea appointment and he was struggling for his watch-keeping ticket.

The Captain made him struggle so much, that the moment he got his watch-keeping ticket, he volunteered for aviation to escape from the surface navy forever.

He was enjoying his flying when the navy decided to remind him that he was still in white uniform and appointed him as the Commanding Officer of a surface ship.

He was quite disgusted and remarked to me: “You know how I had a tough time doing my watch-keeping. I am bloody clueless, but thankfully my officers seem to be quite clued up and I have decided to leave everything to them. I hope that this sea tenure is over fast so that I can get back to my flying.”

I told him about myself – where all I had been transferred since those glorious Mumbai days.

“Hey, why don’t you come over for a glass of beer tomorrow? I’ll tell them to make your favourite Asian Fried Rice for lunch,” he said.

“Okay,” I said, “I’ll be on board at 12.”

Next afternoon, we sat in the Captain’s Cabin sipping chilled beer.

I observed that his cabin was in bad shape.

He must have noticed that I had noticed, because he said, “Look at this shabby cabin – everything seems to be dilapidated – and just imagine – this is supposed to be the Captain’s Cabin,” he complained.

I nodded.

“Hey, you are in the dockyard – can you do something?” he asked.

“Sure – I’ll try,” I said.

When I returned to my office, I called “good cop” and mentioned it to him.

“Good Cop” smiled and said: “Sir, no problem – I will visit the ship, see what is to be done and get things moving. After all, he is your friend.”

My friend’s cabin was refurbished on priority, and soon, his cabin was the best Captain’s Cabin in his squadron.

He was so happy, that he praised the dockyard effusively, mentioning me in particular, to his seniors in the fleet, the good words carried, and this earned me words of appreciation from various quarters.

Now, there was a hot-shot CO of a ship in his squadron who thought he was “cat’s whiskers”.

When he visited my friend’s cabin, he too wanted his cabin refurbished.

My friend told him to meet me.

Now, though this “hot shot” officer was roughly of my seniority, he thought it below his dignity to come over and meet me – after all he was a prima donna Commanding Officer from the crème de la crème Executive Branch and he was not going to grovel before a lowly technical officer.

So he sent an official request asking that his cabin be refurbished.

I promptly forwarded this request to “bad cop”.

“Bad Cop” had a look at the request, thought for a while, and then stamped it “QA”.

The “hot shot’ CO was flabbergasted.

He promptly sent his XO to find out what “QA” meant.

I sent the XO to “bad cop” who patiently explained to the XO that “QA” meant “Quote Authority”.

The XO asked: “what does ‘authority’ mean? Who or what is the ‘authority’ to be quoted?”

In his typical style, our “bad cop” said matter-of-factly: “Sir, how do I know? If I knew I wouldn’t ask you.”

The XO went back to his ship and told the CO what had transpired. He advised the CO to meet me.

“I am a Commanding Officer. I don’t meet small fry. Get me an appointment with the General Manager (GM),” the CO told his XO.

Next morning the GM called me to his office.

The “hot shot” CO was sitting there.

I sat beside him, and looked at my GM across the table, and asked, “Anything, Sir?”

“He says you refused to refurbish his cabin,” the GM said to me.

“Sir, it is not an operational job. So I asked him to Quote Authority,” I said.

The GM looked at the “hot shot” CO and said matter-of-factly, “Okay. That’s it. Just quote authority and the job will be done.”

“But, Sir, he did the same job on another ship – he refurbished the Captain’s Cabin of XXX who is the CO of my one of my squadron ships YYY…” the “hot shot” CO complained vociferously.

The GM looked at me and raised his eyebrow.

“Sir, that CO is a good friend of mine – he requested me personally – so I did the job on bhai-bandi basis,” I said.

“I see,” the GM said.

Then the GM looked at the “hot shot” CO and said, “Well, you decide – the choice is yours – either you Quote Authority or see if you can get the job done on bhai-bandi basis.”

One hour later, there was an invitation from the “hot shot” CO calling me over for a glass of beer.


MORAL OF THE STORY

The “man at sea” must always remember that it is the “shore based moguls” who call the shots.

(Many merchant mariners tell me this is true in the merchant navy as well)

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Humor in Uniform - WARDROOM POLITICS

HUMOUR IN UNIFORM

Elections are going on, it is the political season, so here is some “political” humor in uniform:

WARDROOM POLITICS
Unforgettable Vignettes of my Glorious Navy Days
By
VIKRAM KARVE

WARDROOM ETIQUETTE – TABOO TOPICS

When I joined the Navy, I was told that certain things were not to be discussed in the wardroom (officers’ mess).

Firstly, officers should not “talk shop” in the wardroom.

Secondly, three topics are considered taboo in a navy wardroom:

1. Religion
2. Politics
3. Sex

I am sure the same is true for army and air force officers’ messes as well.

But this was all in theory.

In actual fact, I found that things were vastly different.

On my ship, and in other ships and shore establishments too, officers invariably “talked shop” in the wardroom – even during PLDs and Parties.

Of the three taboo topics, the first – Religion – was never discussed (at least in my ships’ wardrooms).

On my ship, with so many young strapping testosterone charged bachelors around, the third topic was always a hot topic of discussion.

Our ship was based in Mumbai (then called Bombay) and those were laissez faire halcyon days in the Navy – guests were freely allowed on ships, in the evenings and on holidays, and many “smart” libidinous bachelors brought girl friends (or “fleet auxiliaries”) on board, for an amorous drink in the wardroom, or a quickie in their cabins, and these “peccadilloes” were hotly discussed with great excitement by the envious sex-starved puritans secretly yearning for female company.


POLITICS IN UNIFORM

Towards the end of 1979, general elections were announced to be held in the first week of January 1980, and suddenly everyone started discussing politics.

I was surprised to see the political awareness and keen interest in the elections.

Of course, this may have been due to the political instability due to the disastrous performance of two successive shaky coalition governments since 1977 which kept splitting till they collapsed and elections were announced after 2 years.

Or maybe, this was because we had many “politically connected” officers on board.

The father of one of the young officers was a veteran politician and was contesting this election too.

The brother of another officer was a politician too – and he was also contesting elections, albeit from a different party.

Many other officers evinced keen interest in current affairs, held divergent political views, which led to lively discussions, and, yes, politics was discussed in the wardroom.

However, there was one officer who showed absolutely no interest in the proceedings.

He came to the wardroom to drink – in fact, it seemed he had joined the navy to drink, and, like some people “live to eat” this officer “lived to drink”.

While everyone was engrossed in animated “political discussions”, he would sit disinterestedly in the corner downing peg after peg of Scotch whisky.

Voting day was in the first week of the coming January, and as the elections approached, some of us got our postal ballots and some did not.

Outside, political temperatures were getting heated up, and inside the wardroom too, there took place rousing discussions, stimulated by the imbibing of enormous amounts of alcohol.

Of course, our “apolitical” friend kept aloof and remained indifferent to the goings on, despite imbibing even greater amounts of alcohol than the others.

At last, voting took place.

The next day, counting of votes began.

That evening, carrying our whisky topped hip-flasks in our pockets, we trooped down to the Indian Express Building at Nariman Point to watch the election results unfold.

Late at night, it became clear that Indira Gandhi was heading for a massive victory (her party, Congress (I), would win 353 of the 542 seats).

Most of us were happy – now there would be a stable government for 5 years.

The two “politically connected” officers were happy too – their relatives, father and brother, had won too.

A celebration was called for, so the wardroom bar was opened the moment we returned back onboard at around midnight.

The “whiff” of the wardroom bar being opened mysteriously reached the “apolitical” officer sleeping in his cabin, and he joined us in a jiffy, topping up his glass to celebrate.

“There was so much political excitement going on – and you were totally disinterested,” someone said to the “apolitical” officer.

“Actually I was worried?” he said.

“Worried?” we asked, puzzled.

The “apolitical” officer took a gulp of whisky and said: “I was worried about my booze. The previous guy was a prohibitionist – he even wanted to stop booze in the services and give dry fruits in lieu. I am happy he has lost – at least the new guys who have won will let booze flow freely. Come on. Cheers. Drink up. The next round of drinks is on me.”


VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 

Disclaimer:
1. This story is a spoof, pure fiction, just for fun and humor, no offence is meant to anyone, so take it with a pinch of salt and have a laugh.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.
 

Saturday, April 12, 2014

TATTOO - DO YOU WANT TO HAVE A TATTOO ?

DO YOU WANT TO HAVE A TATTOO ?

A young man told me that he wanted to join the Army but could not do so since he had a Tattoo.

I was surprised.

I did not know that the Army does not allow individuals with Tattoos to join up.

Traditionally, Tattoos were associated with Navy Sailors.

Merchant Seamen and Naval Sailors, who sailed across the high seas to distant lands, came back with exotic tattoos inked on their bodies as a testimony to their travels and as a permanent memory of the ports they had visited.

So, the tradition of tattooing, or permanently inking your body, soon became associated with sailors  men who sailed the high seas to exotic destinations.

I do not know whether the Indian Navy allows tattoos.

I do not have a tattoo nor did I see any of my shipmates get themselves inked with tattoos on their bodies, but I have seen a few merchant navy sailors with tattoos.

Do the Indian Army and Air Force allow tattoos?

I do not know.

But I once saw an Army wife with a beautiful tattoo inked on her body at a most curious place.

I once read a story about a lovey-dovey celebrity couple who got each other’s names tattooed, permanently inked, on their bodies as an expression of mutual love.

A few year’s later, the lovers had a break up and separated.

Now, after the break up, the tattoo of love became a symbol of hate, and they wanted to get their tattoos removed, and in the laborious process they ended up damaging their skin.

Tattoos are painful to get inked – so I really wonder why people are willing to undergo pain just to ink their skin.

I never felt the need to get a tattoo.

I have always wondered why so many people, especially celebrities, like to ink their bodies permanently with tattoos.

Here is a post I wrote last year in which I try to fathom the mysterious question  Why Do People Have Tattoos?


TATTOO – WHY DO PEOPLE HAVE TATTOOS
Curious Musings
By
VIKRAM KARVE

Whenever I see a person with a tattoo, I get intrigued.

Why do people have tattoos made on their body?

Why do some beautiful persons stain and blemish their soft flawless skin?

Why do they go through the expensive and painful process of inking?

What is the reason people want to have a tattoo? 

In order to understand this mystery I decided to go into the basics of human behavior.

Tell me: “Why do you behave in the way you do?”

You behave in a certain way to satisfy your needs at that point of time.

In fact, all your behaviour is governed by your intrinsic motivation to satisfy your needs.

Yes, your needs influence your behaviour

The process of human behavior can be summarized in four steps:

1. A need is aroused within you

2. You behave in a way to satisfy the need

3. The need is satisfied

4. You relax


So, what do you think are the “needs” that motivate a person to have a tattoo?

What are the “needs” that motivated you to get a tattoo, if you already have a tattoo?

Or, if you intend to get a tattoo, what is motivating you get your body inked?


WHAT “NEED” MOTIVATED YOU TO HAVE A TATTOO

Do you have a tattoo?

Yes?

Do tell us: What was the “need” you wanted to satisfy by having a tattoo?

Was it the need for thrill and adventure?

Did you have a tattoo to satisfy your need to seek attention?

Or is your tattoo your way of expressing your sense of rebellion in order to satisfy your needs for freedom or self-expression?

Did you have a tattoo due to peer pressure to satisfy your need to belong or conformance or identification with a group?

Historically, tattoos were used to brand slaves – so maybe you wanted to be “branded” as someone’s “slave” so you got that person’s name tattooed on your body.

Is that the reason you got your lover’s name tattooed on your body – to fulfill your need to show off your love or your need to be dominated.

Did you want to display to the world that you “belong” to your lover and you are his “slave” and vice versa?

What will happen if you break up with your lover whose name is tattooed on your body?

Someone once told me that people have secret tattoos in hidden places on the body which no one can see – like at the base of the spine on the lower back just above the derriere.

It is a mystery as to why people have such tattoos, but obviously they are satisfying some need – maybe some need for secrecy or sensuality or exclusivity.


SHOULD YOU THINK TWICE BEFORE YOU INK YOUR BODY WITH A TATTOO ?

They say that tattoos are expensive, painful and permanent.

I also heard that tattoo removal is even more expensive and painful.

I read an article once that in many cases tattoo removal may be ineffective.

I do not know whether it is true, but someone told me that it is impossible to actually remove a tattoo – you can lighten it, nothing more.

And you may never get back the flawless skin that you had before you got the tattoo done. 

If your skin is sensitive, it may get damaged or discoloured forever.

I am sure that before a person decides to have a tattoo done on their body, they know all these implications.

But their “need” is so strong and overpowering that it motivates them to go ahead and satisfy their need by getting a tattoo.

Like I said earlier, historically, tattoos were used to brand slaves

In ancient times, tattoos were used as a mode of communication between spies.

Once upon a time, members of some mafia used to wear symbolic tattoos to identify as members of a certain crime syndicate.

Seamen and sailors came back with tattoos, a tradition that would soon become associated with men of the sea.

But all this happened in ancient times.

I wonder why so many people have tattoos in this modern age.

If you have a tattoo, or intend getting a tattoo, maybe you can answer this question and tell us:

“Why do you want to have a tattoo?”

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
Vikram Karve has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 to be identified as the author of this work. 
© vikram karve., all rights reserved. 

Disclaimer:
All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.
Copyright © Vikram Karve (All Rights Reserved)
     
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.