Monday, September 1, 2014

DOG CARE - Pet Parenting of Companion Dogs

DOG CARE TIPS

PET PARENTING OF COMPANION DOGS

By
VIKRAM KARVE


Here are some articles I have written based on my experience of Pet Dog Parenting.

Please click the links given below.

The posts will open in a new window for you to read.


DOG CARE  Part 1


ARE YOU READY FOR PET PARENTING?
THREE QUESTIONS YOU MUST ASK YOURSELF BEFORE YOU GET A COMPANION DOG

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2014/06/dog-care-part-1-three-questions-you.html



DOG CARE – Part 2

ADOPTING A DOG
TYPES OF DOG CARE and HUMAN-CANINE RELATIONSHIPS
(4 ways of “adopting” a dog)

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2014/06/dog-care-part-2-adopting-dog.html


DOG CARE  Part 3

LOOKING AFTER YOUR PET DOG IN HER OLD AGE AND ILLNESS

http://karvediat.blogspot.in/2014/06/dog-care-part-3-looking-after-old-and.html


DOG CARE – PART 4

Human – Canine Relationship
EMOTIONAL ATTACHMENT versus “UTILITY VALUE”
Poignant Love of a Pet Parent



DOG CARE – Part 5

LOOKING AFTER A DIABETIC DOG – LIFESTYLE CHANGES



DOG CARE – Part 6

BLIND DOG PARENTING – HOW TO LOOK AFTER A BLIND DOG



Dear Dog Lover:

Do comment and tell us your Dog Care and Pet Parenting Experiences and Views.

(This Series on DOG CARE to be continued...)

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This is based on my personal experience and are my personal views. These tips may or may not work for you. So please do your own due diligence before considering these pet parenting tips.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

BLIND DOG PARENTING – LOOKING AFTER A BLIND DOG

DOG CARE – Part 6

BLIND DOG PARENTING – LOOKING AFTER A BLIND DOG



BLIND DOG PARENTING

LOOKING AFTER A BLIND DOG
Ponderings of a Pet Parent
By
VIKRAM KARVE

A dog can become blind due to many reasons.

Diabetes is a major reason for loss of vision in dogs – dogs with diabetes develop cataracts which may result in blindness.

Whatever the reason, losing vision and becoming blind is traumatic for the dog and distressing for the owner (pet parent).

A vet once told me that a dog got so traumatized and depressed after becoming blind that the dog had to be put to sleep.

Unlike human beings dogs cannot speak and nor can you explain things to them like you can do to human beings.

Dogs get confused and disoriented when they suddenly become blind.

Pet parents become distressed and anxious when their dogs become blind.

A pet dog’s blindness will necessitate lifestyle changes in both the pet parents and the dog.

As a pet parent, you have to overcome your own personal grief, and you will have to help your dog cope with blindness.

Here are a few things dog owners (pet parents) can do to help their dogs mitigate the effects of blindness and with cope up with the tragic situation of losing vision.


COMFORT YOUR BLIND DOG

You must constantly comfort your blind dog.

Try to always be at your dog’s side, touch your dog, and talk to your dog in a loving reassuring voice.

You must “talk” to your dog much more.

Speak to your blind dog in your normal, cheery voice.

Your voice will be very soothing for your blind dog.

In fact, in the initial stages of your dog’s blindness, lovingly caressing and cheerfully talking to your dog will relieve your dog of the distress, agony and sense of isolation due to sudden loss of vision.

Talking to your dog will provide comfort and lessen the dog’s sense of isolation.

Your voice and your touch will assure your dog of your companionship.

The most important factor in how well a dog copes with blindness is the love and reassurance you give your dog, as a pet parent.

You must remember that despite becoming blind, your dog can continue to be a loving companion – in fact, the bonding between you and your dog will become stronger.


HELP YOUR BLIND DOG RE-ORIENT TO THE ENVIRONMENT

Sudden onset blindness can be much harder for both the dog and pet parent, than a gradual loss of vision.

A dog with sudden onset blindness is plunged into darkness without warning will become disoriented due to which the dog will experience trauma and anxiety.

As a loving pet parent, you must help your dog overcome this disorientation caused by sudden blindness.

One mitigating factor is that dogs do not rely on their sense of vision to the same extent as do humans.

Your dog depends on other senses like hearing and smell

Of all your dog’s senses, eyesight is third in order of importance after hearing and smell.

You can help your blind dog re-orient by facilitating your dog in using these senses of smell and hearing, along with the sense of touch.

It is best to start re-orienting your dog in a known environment – like your home.

Then, gradually extend to other familiar environments, like your dog’s regular walking routes and play area in your compound.

Be patient when you guide your dog in his familiar surroundings.

Let the dog sniff around, recognize familiar smells – and if you are outside – let the dog “mark” familiar spots.

Help your dog “map-out” his surroundings in his mind, both inside your house and outside.

To help your blind dog negotiate his way around, teach your dog “key words” such as “1-2” for climbing stairs, “walkie-walkie” for the dog to follow you, “stop” for your dog to stop whenever there is some obstruction/hazard etc etc.

You will see that within a few days, your blind dog will re-discover and map-out your house and his familiar surroundings.

You must facilitate your blind dog to overcome the disorientation caused by sudden blindness and re-orient himself by allowing your dog plenty of opportunity to explore and sniff around.

Soon, your blind dog will start enjoying going out on walks with you as before.

However, you should be very careful to ensure that your dog does not injure himself, so keep an eagle eye and a tight leash.

As time passes, you will notice that your blind dog’s sense of smell, touch and hearing will become more sensitive and, to a certain extent, this will compensate for the loss of vision.


TAKE PRECAUTIONS TO AVOID INJURIES TO YOUR BLIND DOG

You must take precautions, both indoors and outdoors, to ensure that your bind dog does not injure himself due to his lack of vision.

Remember, a blind dog cannot see things like before – the blind dog can only smell, hear and sense things.

Inside your home, remove all potential hazards, like tables with sharp edges and other obstructions, by rearranging your furniture in order to make your home safe to move around for your blind dog (you must do this quickly, before you start re-orienting your dog to your house).

A blind dog may have a tendency to walk close to the walls in order to avoid obstacles in the middle of the room so ensure you close cupboard doors, slide in all drawers and keep areas near the wall clear of objects so your dog does not bump into them.

Outside, you must keep your dog on a tight leash and be very alert to ensure your dog does not injure himself by stepping onto sharp objects or banging his head or nose into walls or things.

Preventing injuries is particularly important for blind dogs who have diabetes, since curing of injuries is difficult in diabetic dogs.

Do not scare your blind dog by suddenly touching him or by moving objects (like his food bowl) towards him.

Talk to your dog before you extend your hand.

Tap your dog’s food bowl and call out “Food” or “Mum Mum” to your dog and let your blind dog slowly sniff and approach so that he does not injure nose by banging it against the bowl.

Avoid taking your dog to unfamiliar places where the dog will get disoriented and is likely to injure himself.

As I said before, preventing injuries is particularly important for blind dogs who have diabetes, since curing of injuries is difficult in diabetic dogs.


MAKE LIFESTYLE CHANGES TO CARE FOR YOUR BLIND DOG

You will have to keep the “morale” of your blind dog in high spirits at all times in order to prevent your dog sinking into despondency and depression due to his blindness.

For achieving this, you will have to make changes in your lifestyle.

When your dog becomes blind, you will notice that the dog’s personality may change and your dog may become more affectionate as he becomes totally dependent on you.

A blind dog’s constant need for love and companionship may create “separation anxiety” in your dog.

Your blind dog will always want you in close proximity and will hate to be left alone.

Your blind dog may howl in a heart rending manner if he senses you are going out and leaving him alone.

This means, that if you have a blind dog, you or someone from your family will always have to be at home.

You will not be able to go out together.

You will not be able to leave your blind dog at a boarding kennel and go outstation on vacations.

Even if you have to go out on work, someone will have to be at home to look after the dog.

Many people are ready to look after a healthy dog.

But it is difficult to look after a blind dog.

This is particularly so if your dog is diabetic in addition to being blind, since you have to give him the prescribed diet and medicines at the proper times.

So, you will have to give maximum companionship to your blind dog, both indoors and outdoors.

Talk to your blind dog in a cheerful manner, play with him, take him out for walks, and establish your dog’s routines.

In order to help your blind dog adjust better, it is good to take your dog for a walk on the same route where the smells, sounds and feel of the ground are familiar.

Walk slowly and let your blind dog sniff around and help him become comfortable and re-assured.

You will not be able to take your blind dog with you on visits to other places, to avoid disorientation and injury.

In a nutshell, in order to keep your blind dog in good cheer and high morale, you will have to give him constant companionship and spend more time with your dog.

This will entail lifestyle changes involving curtailment of your social life, and may necessitate compromises in your work life too.


BLIND DOG CARE

Looking after a blind dog is a challenging and stressful task.

Words cannot describe the agony a pet parent feels when he sees his beloved dog suddenly become blind and helpless.

Most loving pet parents get terribly distressed when their dog becomes blind and loses his vision.

Remember that your pet dog can sense your emotions, so it is best that you maintain a calm, upbeat, positive and cheerful attitude and do not transmit negative vibes to your blind dog.

You must help your blind dog adjust to vision loss as quickly as possible, and restore your dog’s confidence and keep him in high morale.

Here are some words of sage advice to pet parents whose dogs have become blind:

“What I say to people is, look, your dog couldn’t read, write or drive a car, anyway. He’s already got four other senses that are better than yours. As long as you take good care of him, he’ll be okay.”

~ Nick Whelan, Canine Ophthalmologist, Ontario Veterinary College

When your dog becomes blind, you must lovingly help your dog adapt his lifestyle to compensate for his blindness.

You must bond closely with your dog and develop the dog’s self-confidence so that your dog remains cheerful despite his tragic loss of vision.

When people get dogs they never imagine that their dog can become blind, or develop some other serious disease or disability.

Let me post a poem (I discovered on the internet) in which a blind dog speaks to its “parents”:

I cannot see you Mommy, when you cuddle me so near.
And yet I know you love me, it's in the words I hear.

I cannot see you Daddy, when you hold me by your side
But still I know you love me when you tell me so with pride.

I cannot see to run and play out in the sun so bright
For here inside my tiny head it's always dark as night.

I cannot see the treats you give when I am extra good
But I can wag my tail in “Thanks” just like a good dog should.

“She cannot see. The dog is no good” is what some folks might say
“She can't be trained, she will never learn, She must be put away.”

But not you, Mom and Daddy, You know that it is alright
Because I love you just as much as any dog with sight.

You took me in, you gave me love and we will never part
Because I am blind with just my eyes, I see you in my heart.

~ Sherrill Wardrip


BLIND DOG PARENTING

If you are a genuine dog lover, pet parenting may turn out to be more difficult than parenting your human children.

Your human children will grow up, leave the “nest” and fly away to their careers and to pursue their own lives.

But your dog will be dependent on you for his entire life – you will have to bring him up in his childhood, look after your dog in his old age, and, you will have to endure the pain of your dog dying before your eyes, for dogs only live for around 10 years.

Adopting a dog is a challenging long term commitment – you are committing yourself to look after the dog for the dog’s entire lifetime of about 10 years and care for the dog in its illness and old age.

Remember – it is easy to get a dog, but it is difficult to look after the dog for its entire lifetime.

And, by a twist of misfortune, if your dog becomes blind, let me summarize the essence of Blind Dog Parenting, and recap the 4 points I told you on how to look after a blind dog:

1. Comfort your blind dog

2. Help your blind dog re-orient to the environment

3. Take precautions to avoid injuries to your blind dog

4. Make lifestyle changes to care for your blind dog


(To be continued…)

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
1. This is based on my personal experience and are my personal views. These tips may or may not work for you. So please do your own due diligence before considering these pet parenting tips.
2. All stories in this blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the story are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

Sunday, August 31, 2014

MILITARY LIFE - TWO FACES OF THE ARMY

MILITARY LIFE
TWO FACES OF THE ARMY
Ramblings of a Retired Veteran
By
VIKRAM KARVE

(The generic term “Army” includes all the three Armed Forces – Army, Navy and Air Force)

IS THE ARMY LIKE ANY OTHER JOB?

“The Army is like any other job,” the lady in the bank said.

We were waiting for our pension certificates.

A gentleman identified himself as a retired Army Officer, as a Defence Pensioner.

The lady at the bank counter thought he was trying to jump the queue.

So she looked icily at the Army Veteran and said: “Why do you army people always want special treatment? Everyone here is a pensioner, but you defence pensioners always want special privileges, even after retirement. As far as I am concerned, the army is like any other job. In fact, you people have so many facilities and enjoy the best lifestyle, but you still want more concessions and special treatment everywhere …”

I smiled to myself.

The lady was not at fault.

She lived in Pune, a salubrious peacetime army cantonment.

So she had seen only one face of the Army – what I like to call the “posh” face of the armed forces.


THE “POSH” FACE OF THE ARMY

The lady at the bank had seen the “posh” face of the army visible all over Pune.

Whenever she went to Pune Camp, she saw army officers and their families moving around in style in chauffeur driven army staff cars and jeeps.

She saw these official army cars and jeeps parked majestically on MG Road, and at entrances to Malls and Stores, some staff cars parked brazenly in no parking zones, with the police not daring to question the uniformed drivers, while the army officers and their wives and families went around shopping.

On a few occasions, her friend and erstwhile school classmate, who was married to an army officer, had taken her to the CSD canteen, the club and then to her well-appointed house in the posh cantonment and boasted of the facilities she enjoyed in the army.

She saw that army officers and their families had access to the best of facilities – sports, swimming pools, clubs, golf, schools, chauffeur driven cars, subsidized canteens etc

She saw that the army provided a full time “sahayak” who took care of all household chores and outside errands too – so her friend who was married to an army officer did not have to do any household work and was free to enjoy social and entertainment activities like ladies club, kitty parties and lead a posh life.

And to top it all, army officers enjoyed quality time with their families and for various social and sporting activities, because of fewer working hours.

Indeed, the army provided a good life.

This is the “posh” face which the army projects to civilians.


THE “HARSH REALITY” FACE

But the army has another face too – which it does not project to civilians.

Does the common citizen in a modern metropolis, like Pune, know that a part of the army is in a constant state of combat on the borders, LOC, LAC and militant infested areas?

Are they aware of the stress, dangers and hardships army officers face in conflict zones and field areas?

Are civilians aware of the trials and tribulations army wives and families undergo as a consequence of being in a constant state of stress when their husbands are posted in the field?

Do civilians living in urban India know about the yeoman’s service that the Indian Army renders in the border and remote areas of India?

First and foremost the Army provides security – this is well known to all.

But does the common citizen know that the army is involved in virtually every aspect of life in these inaccessible and hazard-prone areas?

Besides providing medical facilities, medical treatment, mercy missions, casualty evacuation, and rescue and relief missions – even running schools and giving education facilities to local population in these inhospitable areas – it is the Army that delivers Social Welfare, is involved in Community Development and gives succour for population of border and remote areas of India where the civilian administration is scant and people depend on the Army for everything.

Do civilians know that it is this yeoman’s service that the Indian Army renders in the border and remote areas of India which keeps these regions united and connected with the rest of nation.

Whenever there is a calamity, the armed forces are the first to rush in for rescue and relief even at danger to their own lives.

The Indian Army does great things which go unnoticed because of inadequate information dissemination to the public and citizens about the Army’s multifarious activities.

This is the challenging, arduous “harsh reality” face of the army.

Is it not high time the army projects this true face of military life to civilians?

Only then will uninformed naive civilians, living comfortably in urban India, appreciate the hardships and challenges of military life, and they will think twice before saying: “The Army is like any other job”.

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)

Saturday, August 30, 2014

SLEEPING BEAUTY – A “clued-up” Army Wife’s Mantra for Wining and Dining in and out of Uniform

I have just finished reading SOLDIER AND SPICE (An Army Wife’s Life) by Aditi Mathur Kumar 

It is a delightful book – witty yet insightful.

I loved the peppy writing style, which keeps you in splits, engrossed from start to finish. 

The book has great Page Turning Quality (PTQ) and once you start reading it, the book is “unputdownable”, and I read it in one sitting.

Reading this hilarious story of an army wife reminded me of an unforgettable army wife who I had nicknamed “Sleeping Beauty”.

So, let me delve into my Humour in Uniform Archives and pull out this anecdote about “Sleeping Beauty” for you:

(Of course, I can’t match Aditi’s scintillating writing style, so you will have to bear with my rather prosaic and prolix rambling...)

SLEEPING BEAUTY 
A “clued-up” Army Wife’s Mantra for Wining and Dining in and out of Uniform
Unforgettable Memories of my Navy Life
A Spoof
By
VIKRAM KARVE

There are two kinds of military wives.

The first category comprises “clued-up” military wives:

1. Ladies who are aware of life in the military – girls who come from a military background, daughters of military officers, or girls who have seen the life of a military wife from close quarters as they have a relative or friend in the military or they know someone married to a military man, or because they have lived in the proximity of a military cantonment and are acquainted with the lifestyle. 

Nowadays, with the increasing number of “marriages in uniform”, you even have military wives who are serving military officers who are “know-it-all” on matters military.

There is a second category of newly married military wives:

2. Ladies who have had absolutely no exposure to military life – and hence these young naive and innocent girls are completely oblivious of the unique military culture and are totally unaware of the kind of social life a military wife has to lead.

“Sleeping Beauty” belonged to the second category.

She did not have a clue about army life.

She was born in a family of academicians and brought up in the tranquil environment of a university campus in a small town.

Since it was not a military town, the only persons she saw in uniform were the odd NCC officers on the university campus.

Of intellectual bent of mind and possessing an academic nature herself, she was pursuing her Ph. D. when there was a marriage proposal for her from an army officer Captain “X”.

Things moved fast, and suddenly she found herself married to Captain “X” and arrived with her newly wedded husband at the SP Marg Officers Mess in New Delhi.

In fact, it was in the same week that I arrived with my newly wedded wife at the same SP Marg Officers Mess in New Delhi, where we, Captain “X” and I, were living as happy bachelors for about one year, before we got married, in the same month, almost on the same day.

In those good-old “pre-jointmanship” days, the SP Marg Officers Mess was an inter-service combined Army-Navy Officers Mess, like Kota House.

But the happy situation, of bonhomie and camaraderie, did not last forever, since a few years later, in an act of “jointmanship”, the Army evicted Naval Officers from the SP Marg Officers Mess, and, in a retaliatory gesture of “jointmanship”, the Navy evicted all Army Officers from the Kota House Officers Mess.

Even today, as I hark back, I fondly cherish my glorious days at SP Marg Officers Mess, the atmosphere of bonhomie in the evenings when we all sat together on the lawns or in the bar enjoying our drinks.

During my SP Marg days, I made friends with a number of army officers – and one of my good friends from the army was Captain “X”.

On New Year’s Eve, we sat at the DSOI, downing peg after peg of rum, and suddenly we decided that we both had endured enough of bachelorhood and it was time to get married.

Within six months, we, “X” and I, were sitting together with our newly-wedded wives on the lawns of SP Marg Officers Mess.

Soon, we shifted to Curzon Road Apartments, and we were next door neighbours.

Our erstwhile mess-mates from SP Marg would invariably “bounce” us, whenever they were in the vicinity at Connaught Place or India Gate.

These bachelor officers would suddenly land up unannounced any time of the day and night, demanding food and drink – sometimes even at the oddest of hours, like on their way back from a late night movie show.

These impromptu food and booze sessions, which lasted till the wee hours of the morning, came as a big surprise for “Sleeping Beauty” who was used to the placid social life of a small town university campus where “early to bed, early to rise” was the norm.

Having never seen even a drop of alcohol in her parents’ home, these unrestrained drinking binges, where everyone consumed enormous amounts of alcohol and many officers got high and behaved with wild abandon, caused her even greater cultural shock.

However, she adapted herself to her new life, and to compensate for the sleep deprivation due to the late nights by sleeping during the day – hence I gave her the nickname: “Sleeping Beauty”.

One evening, around 7 PM, on my way to my flat, I saw “Sleeping Beauty” eating her dinner.

(Those of you who have lived in Curzon Road Apartments will know that the Kitchenette of the one room flat was located at the entrance, which opened in a corridor – and we mostly kept the door open for cross-ventilation).

So, as I walked down the corridor to my flat, I saw “Sleeping Beauty” standing before the gas stove with a plate in her hand.

The plate was filled with generous amounts of a variety of dishes and she was merrily eating away.

“Having dinner so early?” I asked her.

“No. No. I am just tasting the food to see it is okay,” she said.

“Tasting? So much?” I asked, pointing towards her filled plate.

She laughed, and said: “Okay. I will tell you. My husband has invited his boss and all the officers in his office and their wives for dinner. By the time they finish their drinks and have dinner it will be past midnight and I will feel very hungry by then. So, I am having my dinner now itself.”

“You are eating your dinner now itself, even before the guests arrive?” I asked her, flabbergasted.

“Yes. I am going to have my full meal – even the sweet dish. Then it doesn’t matter how long they keep drinking and whatever time they eat their food. I will have a second round of food with them just to keep up appearances, or maybe I will be a bit hungry by then,” she said.

I marveled at the earthy wisdom of the young bride – it was so breathtaking in its simplicity – a useful mantra for all hostesses, especially for military wives who have to entertain a lot.

I will always thank “Sleeping Beauty” for this pointer for hostesses, which I suggested to my wife and many ladies.

In fact, I started following Sleeping Beauty’s mantra myself once I joined the ranks of teetotallers who anxiously wait for dinner to be served while the boozers keep endlessly downing drink after drink.

So, if you are “fauji” wife, whenever you invite people for dinner, you know what to do.

Happy Wining and Dining in Uniform!

VIKRAM KARVE
Copyright © Vikram Karve 
1. If you share this post, please give due credit to the author Vikram Karve
2. Please DO NOT PLAGIARIZE. Please DO NOT Cut/Copy/Paste this post
© vikram karve., all rights reserved.

Disclaimer:
All Stories in this Blog are a work of fiction. Events, Places, Settings and Incidents narrated in the stories are a figment of my imagination. The characters do not exist and are purely imaginary. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
Copyright Notice:
No part of this Blog may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Blog Author Vikram Karve who holds the copyright.

Copyright © Vikram Karve (all rights reserved)
 

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About Vikram Karve

A creative person with a zest for life, Vikram Karve is a retired Naval Officer turned full time writer and blogger. Educated at IIT Delhi, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, The Lawrence School Lovedale and Bishops School Pune, Vikram has published two books: COCKTAIL a collection of fiction short stories about relationships (2011) and APPETITE FOR A STROLL a book of Foodie Adventures (2008) and is currently working on his novel and a book of vignettes and an anthology of short fiction. An avid blogger, he has written a number of fiction short stories and creative non-fiction articles on a variety of topics including food, travel, philosophy, academics, technology, management, health, pet parenting, teaching stories and self help in magazines and published a large number of professional  and academic research papers in journals and edited in-house journals and magazines for many years, before the advent of blogging. Vikram has taught at a University as a Professor for 15 years and now teaches as a visiting faculty and devotes most of his time to creative writing and blogging. Vikram Karve lives in Pune India with his family and muse - his pet dog Sherry with whom he takes long walks thinking creative thoughts.

Vikram Karve Academic and Creative Writing Journal: http://karvediat.blogspot.com
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Email: vikramkarve@hotmail.com
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